Francis’ resignation and his false prophet Schneider

June 22, 2019

Auxiliary Bishop Schneider wrote a treatise on March 20, 2019, entitled “On the question of a heretical pope”. It is based on the absurd assumption that a heretical pope can in no case be deprived of his office. Moreover, he claims that even if a pope committed the gravest heresies or monstrous moral crimes, he must – in his view – remain in office. This Schneider’s view is against Holy Scripture, Gal 1:8-9, against the Bull of Paul IV as well as against the words of many saints. To confirm his theory, he uses a manipulative comparison.

Anathema – defence of the Gospel and punishment for heresies

20 June 2019

What is anathema according to Scripture? It is the exclusion from the Mystical Body of Christ – the Church – for the proclamation of another gospel (Gal 1:8-9). Another gospel means heresies which destroy the essence of the saving faith.

What is meant by “the Church” is an external structure, i.e. church organization, as well as internal organism – the Mystical Body of Christ.

You shall not commit adultery – Scripture and Tradition

February 19, 2019

Contemporary gender ideology coupled with the so-called LGBTQ promotion diametrically contradicts the Spirit and the letter of Scripture as well as Tradition. The justification of this sin in the Catechism 2358-59 as well as Francis’ kissing of the feet of transgenders leads to the mass spread of perversion.

Metanoia – orthopraxy /Advent 2018/

8 December 2018

In these times of spiritual chaos, one needs to have a clear grasp of the means that lead to spiritual life – orthopraxy.

1) Celebration of Sunday

On the night from Saturday to Sunday, Christ rose from the dead. On Sunday, too, at about nine o’clock in the morning, the Holy Spirit was sent down on the Apostles and the Church was born. The early Christians were built on four spiritual pillars (Acts 2:42):

  1. prayers,
  2. apostles’ doctrine (an interpretation of God’s Word in the same Spirit as it was taught by the Apostles),
  3. fellowship (koinonia),
  4. the breaking of bread (the Eucharist).

Prayers for the celebration of Sunday (everybody prays at home)

The Epiclesis /Part four: The Epiclesis – The Temple and Iconostasis/

26 November 2018

The biblical model of the Christian temple is the vision given by God (to Moses). It was applied to the Jerusalem Temple. The basic structure consists of the Holy of Holies, where God is present in a special way, the Holy Place, where the priests offered sacrifices to God, and the place for people.

The Eastern temple with an iconostasis, altar and tabernacle has preserved this biblical structure to this day. The Western Church had preserved it only until the Second Vatican Council which carried out an absurd reform. After the reform, the priest, who represents the people and offers sacrifice to God on the altar in their behalf, has turned his back to the centre of the temple, which is the tabernacle where God’s presence dwells constantly. Moreover, in many places the tabernacle has been removed from the centre of the temple. The reform has also removed the rail which separated the place for priests and for those who served at the altar.

The Epiclesis /Part three: The Epiclesis – How to experience the Epiclesis in the Liturgy/

25 November 2018

The Epiclesis is the invocation of the Holy Spirit both on us and on the gifts. It has three parts:

1) The priest kneels and implores God in a spirit: Send down the Holy Spirit upon us (Note: Throughout the Epiclesis, the chorus sings the antiphon: “We praise You…” or there is silence).

God promises through the prophet Ezekiel (37): “Behold, I will send spirit into you, and you shall live.” – We beseech in spirit: Lord, give us the Spirit of repentance, that we may live!

“I will put sinews on you” – Put sinews on us – the gift of prayer!

“I will bring flesh upon you” – Fill us with the power of Your commandments!

“I will cover you with protective skin” – Give us living communities!

“I will put Spirit in you, and you shall live” – Put the fullness of the Spirit in us, that we may live! Ye-ho-shu-aaa

The Epiclesis /Part two: The Holy Spirit and the Epiclesis/

22 November 2018

Before His death, before sacrificing His body and blood on the cross, Jesus established this sacrifice of the cross to be offered to God for the remission of sins. The symbolic sin-offerings, when the blood and life of the sacrificial lambs was offered in the Jerusalem temple, lost their significance. Jesus is the true Lamb who took on Himself the sins of the world (Jn 1:29). Before the completion of His sacrifice of the cross, Jesus instituted a new sacrifice, which is also a new covenant (Mt 26:26) for the forgiveness of sins. At the Last Supper, He took bread and said, “This is My body, which is given for you.” Then He took the cup of wine and said, “This is My blood of the new covenant, which is shed … for the remission of sins.”

What about the Apostles? What did they think? They did not understand His words because His sacrifice had not yet been accomplished. During the Last Supper, Jesus also spoke a number of times about the Holy Spirit, “I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now. However, when the Spirit of truth has come, He will guide you into all truth.” (Jn 16:13)

The Epiclesis /Part one: The Difference between Eastern and Western Liturgy/

21 November 2018

Part one: The Difference between Eastern and Western Liturgy, the Question of Epiclesis

Part two: The Holy Spirit and the Epiclesis

Part three: How to experience the Epiclesis in the Liturgy

Part four: Liturgical Space and Iconostasis

Part one: The Difference between Eastern and Western Liturgy, the Question of Epiclesis

The Eastern Liturgy of St Basil the Great and St John Chrysostom (4th century) contains the Epiclesis. The Epiclesis is also found in other Eastern rites. It comes directly from the Apostolic Tradition.

What is the difference between Eastern and Western Liturgy? The Western Liturgy was radically modified at the Second Vatican Council. The reform introduced four Canons instead of one. The pre-conciliar Latin Liturgy had no mention of the Holy Spirit in the Canon. The reformed conciliar Liturgy does make mention of the Holy Spirit but it has been inserted before the words of Institution. Unlike the Latin Liturgy, the Eastern Liturgy includes a so-called intense invocation of the Holy Spirit, or the Epiclesis, after the words of Institution.

Choose language

Search

Word of Life

“Now he who keeps His commandments abides in God, and God in him. And by this we know that He abides in us, by the Spirit whom He has given us.”

1Jn 3:24 (14/7/2019 – 28/7/2019)